Friday, July 25, 2014

Saint July 26 : St. Anne : Patron of Wives and Women in Labor - Mother of Mary - Grandmother of Jesus


St. Anne
MOTHER OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY
Feast: July 26


Information:
Feast Day:July 26
Patron of:Housewives, women in labor, cabinet-makers, and miners
Of St. Anne we have no certain knowledge. She is not mentioned in the New Testament, and we must depend on apocryphal literature, chiefly the Protoevangelium of James, which dates back only to the second century.

In this document we are told that Anne, wife of Joachim, was advanced in years and that her prayers for a child had not been answered. Once as she prayed beneath a laurel tree near her home in Galilee, an angel appeared and said to her, "Anne, the Lord hath heard thy prayer and thou shalt conceive and bring forth, and thy seed shall be spoken of in all the world." Anne replied, "As the Lord my God liveth, if I beget either male or female, I will bring it as a gift to the Lord my God; and it shall minister to Him in holy things all the days of its life " And thus Anne became the mother of the Blessed Virgin Mary.
The devotion of St. Anne was known in the East in the fifth century, but it was not diffused in the West until the thirteenth. A shrine at Douai, in northern France, was one of the early centers of the devotion. In 1382 her feast was extended to the whole Western Church, and she became very popular, especially in France. Her two most famous shrines are at St. Anne d'Auray in Brittany and at St. Anne-de Beaupre in the province of Quebec.

She is patroness of housewives, women in labor, cabinet-makers, and miners. Her emblem is a door. St. Anne has been frequently represented in art, and the lovely face depicted by Leonardo da Vinci comes first to mind in this connection. The name Anne derives from the Hebrew Hannah, meaning "grace."


Read more: http://www.ewtn.com/saintsHoly/saints/A/stanne.asp#ixzz1TE3Jl3s3

Saint July 26 : Saint Joachim : Father of Mary - Grandfather of Jesus

St. Joachim
FATHER OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN
Feast: July 26


Information:
Feast Day:July 26
Patron of:Fathers, Grandparents
Joachim (whose name means Yahweh prepares), was the father of the Blessed Virgin Mary. If we were to obey the warning of St. Peter Damian, we should consider it a blameable and needless curiosity to inquire about those things that the Evangelists did not deem it advisable to relate, and, in particular, about the parents of the Blessed Virgin (Serm. iii de Nativ. B.M.V.). Tradition nevertheless, grounded on very old testimonies, very early hailed Saints Joachim and Anne as the father and mother of the Mother of God. True, this tradition seems to rest ultimately on the so-called "Gospel of James", the "Gospel of the Nativity of the Blessed Mary", and the Pseudo-Matthew, or "Book of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary and of the Childhood of the Saviour"; and this origin is likely to rouse well-founded suspicions. It should be borne in mind, however, that the apocryphal character of these writings, that is to say, their rejection from the canon, and their ungenuineness do not imply that no heed whatever should be taken of some of their assertions; side by side, indeed, with unwarranted and legendary facts, they contain some historical data borrowed from reliable traditions or documents; and difficult though it is to distinguish in them the wheat from the tares, it would be unwise and uncritical indiscriminately to reject the whole. Some commentators, who believe that the genealogy given by St. Luke is that of the Blessed Virgin, find the mention of Joachim in Heli (Luke, iii, 23; Eliachim, i.e. Jeho-achim), and explain that Joseph had, in the eyes of the law, become by his marriage the son of Joachim. That such is the purpose and the meaning of the Evangelist is very doubtful, and so is the identification proposed between the two names Heli and Joachim. Neither can it be asserted with certainty, in spite of the authority of the Bollandists, that Joachim was Heli's son and Joseph's brother; nor, as is sometimes affirmed, from sources of very doubtful value, that he had large possessions in herds and flocks. Much more interesting are the beautiful lines in which the "Gospel of James" describes how, in their old age, Joachim and Anne received the reward of their prayers to obtain issue. Tradition has it that the parents of the Blessed Virgin, who, apparently, first lived in Galilee, came later on to settle in Jerusalem; there the Blessed Virgin was born and reared; there also they died and were buried. A church, known at various epochs as St. Mary, St. Mary ubi nata est, St. Mary in Probatica, Holy Probatica, St. Anne, was built during the fourth century, possibly by St. Helena, on the site of the house of St. Joachim and St. Anne, and their tombs were there honoured until the close of the ninth century, when the church was converted into a Moslem school. The crypt which formerly contained the holy tombs was rediscovered on 18 March, 1889.

St. Joachim was honoured very early by the Greeks, who celebrate his feast on the day following the Blessed Virgin's birthday; the Latins were slow to admit it to their calendar, where it found place sometimes on 16 Sept. and sometimes on 9 Dec. Assigned by Julius II to 20 March, the solemnity was suppressed some fifty years later, restored by Gregory XV (1622), fixed by Clement XII (1738) on the Sunday after the Assumption, and finally raised to the rank of double of the second class by Leo XIII (1 Aug., 1879).


SOURCE: http://www.ewtn.com/saintsHoly/saints/J/stjoachim.asp#ixzz1TE3UJXOs

Death Toll in Gaza over 800 as Israel hits UN hospital - 39 Killed in Israel

ASIANEWS IT REPORT: 
Israel and Hamas are vetting a proposal US Secretary of State John Kerry for a temporary ceasefire, during which the parties meet to seek a wider agreement with Egypt's mediation. Yesterday, Israel hit a UN hospital in Gaza, killing at least 15 civilians. (Image Source : Malta Today)


Jerusalem (AsiaNews) - After 18 days of the war, the death has topped 800 in the Gaza Strip, plus two Palestinians killed during a protest march from Ramallah to Jerusalem. Israel is counting its own dead, 39 and almost 200 injured. Meanwhile diplomatic efforts are intensifying to find ways to stop the conflict.
According to Haaretz, Israel and Hamas are examining the latest proposal made by US Secretary of State, John Kerry, which includes a week-long humanitarian ceasefire, starting Sunday, during which the various sides would meet to look for a broader understanding in talks brokered by Egypt. The Palestinian Authority would also attend. The United States, United Nations and the European Union would act as guarantors for the parties.
The Israeli cabinet was expected to discuss the plan on Friday afternoon, but it has several hurdle before it can be accepted, starting with Israel's plan to keep its troops within the Gaza strip during the truce.
Hamas's political leader, Khaled Meshal, has stated that he would not accept an enduring cease-fire until his demands were met, including the lifting of an economic blockade on Gaza. "We want a ceasefire as soon as possible, that's parallel with the lifting of the siege of Gaza," he said.
This is not very likely. Neither side is likely to accept such conditions. Still, a Palestinian official did suggest once the parties agree to the seven-day humanitarian truce "then everyone comes to Cairo for the talks".
Meanwhile, as diplomats try to stop the conflict, people continue to die. Yesterday, Israel hit a UN hospital in Gaza, killing at least 15 civilians. UN workers were also affected.
UN chief Ban Ki-Moon said he was "appalled" at the shelling, which "underscores the imperative for the killing to stop - and to stop now".
Washington said it was "deeply saddened and concerned about the tragic incident", which occurred a day after the UN human rights committee criticised both Israel and Hamas.
The hospital bombing was not the only dramatic event yesterday. Two Palestinians were killed in clashes with Israeli soldiers who stopped more than 10,000 people from a refugee camp near Ramallah, in the West Bank, marching towards Jerusalem to protest Israel's Gaza offensive. At least 108 Palestinians were injured in the clashes.

Yesterday's events near Jerusalem could happen today. With Ramadan coming to an end, this Friday President Mahmoud Abbas declared a "day of rage". Jerusalem, where protests took place yesterday, has been turned into an armed camp.
SHARED FROM ASIA NEWS IT 

Pope Francis makes Surprise visit to eat Lunch with Employees

(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis made a surprise visit on Friday to the Vatican’s canteen for its employees. He turned up there unexpected shortly after noon much to everybody’s astonishment and after taking a tray and cutlery joined the line with all the employees to be served his lunch. Staff at the canteen said he ate pasta without sauce and cod served with grilled tomatoes. He ate his lunch at a long table alongside a group of various employees. Describing the papal visit as "like a thunderbolt out of the blue," the canteen’s chef Franco Pai'ni said the Pope was introduced to the staff and others there and asked them questions about themselves and their work. Afterwards, he paid them compliments on the quality of the food, gave his blessing and took part in a group photo before leaving.

Prayer to St. Christopher for Safe Travels and Motorists

Saint Christopher Prayer"Motorist's Prayer:" Grant me, O Lord, a steady hand and watchful eye, that no one shall be hurt as I pass by. Thou gavest life, I pray no act of mine may take away or mar that gift of Thine. Shelter those, dear Lord, who bear my company from the evils of fire and all calamity.Teach me to use my car for others need; Nor miss through love of undue speed. The beauty of the world; that thus I may with joy and courtesy go on my way. St. Christopher, holy patron of travelers, protect me, and lead me safely to my destiny.
Saint Christopher's Protection Prayer
 Dear Saint Christopher, protect me today in all my travels along the road's way. Give your warning sign if danger is near so that I may stop while the path is clear. Be at my window and direct me through when the vision blurs From out of the blue. Carry me safely to my destined place, like you carried Christ in your close embrace. Amen.
 St. Christopher's Prayer
O Glorious St. Christopher you have inherited a beautiful name, Christbearer, as a result of the wonderful legend that while carrying people across a raging stream you also carried the Child Jesus. Teach us to be true Christbearers to those who do not know Him. Protect all of us that travel both near and far and petition Jesus to be with us always. Amen. Join us on

Novena to St. James the Greater - Patron of Arthritis, Veterinarians - Compostela Pilgrims

Every Day of Novena 1 Our Father, 1 Hail Mary and 1 Glory Be

First Day
The Call of James (Matthew 4:18-22)

As Jesus was walking by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon who is called Peter, and his brother Andrew, casting a net into the sea; they were fishermen. He said to them, "Come after me, and I will make you fishers of men." At once they left their nets and followed him.
            He walked along from there and saw two other brothers, James, the son of Zebedee, and his brother John. They were in a boat, with their father Zebedee, mending their nets. He called them, and immediately they left their boat and their father and followed him.

Reflection
Mending their nets on the shores of the Sea of Galilee, James and John look up to see Jesus.  And he calls them to do something totally new—to follow him; and to become something new as well—“fishers of men.”  Why did Jesus choose fishermen for his first disciples?  Perhaps because fishing takes strength, skill, persistence, and patience.  Perhaps because fishermen live amidst the beauty and danger of the natural world, and understand their dependence on God.  Perhaps because fishermen know when to work long, hard hours, and when to rest.  An Apostle needs all these qualities as well.
     When they hear the Lord’s call, James and John respond at once.  They do not ask questions, finish the task at hand, or even consult with their father; instead, “immediately” they leave the old life behind and follow Jesus. For us, too, the call to discipleship usually comes in the midst of the humdrum patterns of our daily lives, when we are least expecting it.  Are we ready to respond to the Lord’s call—to do something different; to become something new?

Second Day
The Sons of Thunder (Luke 9:51-56)

When the days for his being taken up were fulfilled, Jesus resolutely determined to journey to Jerusalem, and he sent messengers ahead of him. On the way they entered a Samaritan village to prepare for his reception there, but they would not welcome him because the destination of his journey was Jerusalem. When the disciples James and John saw this they asked, "Lord, do you want us to call down fire from heaven to consume them?"
            Jesus turned and rebuked them, and they journeyed to another village.

Reflection
Jesus gave Simon a special name – “Peter.”  Jesus also gives James and John a special name, “Boanerges,” which means “sons of thunder” (Mark 3:17).  Scripture scholars tell us that the giving of a new name is a sign of an inner transformation:  think of Abram, who became Abraham, and Jacob, who became Israel.  James and John must have been full of zeal for the Kingdom to receive a name like “sons of thunder.”
    We get a glimpse of that zeal for the Lord’s work in this passage from Luke.  When the people of one town refuse to welcome Jesus, James and John offer to “call down fire from heaven,” to destroy them as Sodom and Gomorrah were destroyed when they refused to receive the Lord.  But Jesus “rebukes” them.  That is not the way of the Kingdom.  Jesus invites, but he does not command, and his disciples are to do the same.
How do we respond to rejection?  With the “thunder” of James, or with the peace of Christ?

Third Day
A Child Raised from the Dead (Luke 8:40-42, 49-56)

            A man named Jairus, an official of the synagogue, came forward. He fell at the feet of Jesus and begged him to come to his house, because he had an only daughter, about twelve years old, and she was dying…. Someone from the synagogue official's house arrived and said, "Your daughter is dead; do not trouble the teacher any longer."
            On hearing this, Jesus answered him, "Do not be afraid; just have faith and she will be saved."
            When he arrived at the house he allowed no one to enter with him except Peter and John and James, and the child's father and mother. All were weeping and mourning for her, when he said, "Do not weep any longer, for she is not dead, but sleeping."
            And they ridiculed him, because they knew that she was dead. But he took her by the hand and called to her, "Child, arise!" Her breath returned and she immediately arose. He then directed that she should be given something to eat.
            Her parents were astounded, and he instructed them to tell no one what had happened.

Reflection
When Jesus raises the daughter of Jairus from the dead, he does not take all of his disciples with him.  Only Peter, James, and John are in the room with the girl and her parents, when, with a word and a touch of the hand, Jesus restores her to life.
            Jesus tells them all to keep silence about this great miracle.  Only when Jesus himself is raised from the dead will the three Apostles understand what it is they have witnessed:  the very power of God, triumphant over evil, over disease and sickness of every kind, over death itself.  James, with Peter and John, is a special witness to resurrection.  He will be able to speak to others the saving words of Christ:  “just have faith.”
James, Witness to the Glory of Christ (Matthew 17:1-9)

Jesus took Peter, James, and John his brother, and led them up a high mountain by themselves.  And he was transfigured before them; his face shone like the sun and his clothes became white as light. And behold, Moses and Elijah appeared to them, conversing with him.
            Then Peter said to Jesus in reply, "Lord, it is good that we are here. If you wish, I will make three tents here, one for you, one for Moses, and one for Elijah." While he was still speaking, behold, a bright cloud cast a shadow over them, then from the cloud came a voice that said, "This is my beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased; listen to him."
            When the disciples heard this, they fell prostrate and were very much afraid. But Jesus came and touched them, saying, "Rise, and do not be afraid." And when the disciples raised their eyes, they saw no one else but Jesus alone.  As they were coming down from the mountain, Jesus charged them, "Do not tell the vision to anyone until the Son of Man has been raised from the dead."

Reflection
In the Gospel according to Matthew, the Transfiguration of Jesus comes immediately following his first prediction of his Passion.  This is a hard teaching indeed:  how can the Messiah, the Chosen One of God, the Savior, be crucified?  Peter speaks for all of them when he says, “God forbid, Lord!  No such thing shall ever happen to you” (Matthew 16:22).  Jesus reply is harsh:  “get behind me, Satan!  You are thinking not as God does, but as human beings do.”  The disciples begin to understand that to follow Jesus is to carry the cross.
            But there is more.  Jesus allows Peter, James, and John a blinding glimpse of his heavenly glory.  They see him shining brighter than the sun, speaking with Moses and Elijah; and they hear God’s voice, urging them to listen to what he says.  In glimpsing the Transfiguration of Jesus, Peter, James and John are glimpsing the Resurrection.  Jesus shows them this glimpse to help them understand that for all who follow Jesus, suffering and glory go hand in hand.
Fifth Day
With the Lord in the Garden of Gethsemane (Mark 14:32-42)

            They came to a place named Gethsemane, and Jesus said to his disciples, "Sit here while I pray."  He took with him Peter, James, and John, and began to be troubled and distressed. Then he said to them, "My soul is sorrowful even to death. Remain here and keep watch."
            He advanced a little and fell to the ground and prayed that if it were possible the hour might pass by him; he said, "Abba, Father, all things are possible to you. Take this cup away from me, but not what I will but what you will."
            When he returned he found them asleep. He said to Peter, "Simon, are you asleep? Could you not keep watch for one hour?  Watch and pray that you may not undergo the test. The spirit is willing but the flesh is weak."
            Withdrawing again, he prayed, saying the same thing. Then he returned once more and found them asleep, for they could not keep their eyes open and did not know what to answer him.
            He returned a third time and said to them, "Are you still sleeping and taking your rest? It is enough. The hour has come. Behold, the Son of Man is to be handed over to sinners. Get up, let us go. See, my betrayer is at hand."

Reflection
The same three who witnessed Christ in glory – Peter, James, and John – witness his sufferings in the Garden of Gethsemane.  As scripture commentator Marie Noonan Sabin observes, the contrasts between the two scenes are poignant.  There, Jesus shone with dazzling light; here, all is darkness.  There, Jesus stood above the mountain; here, he falls to the ground.  There, the Father spoke words of love; here, Jesus asks his Father to take the cup of suffering away from him.
     In this last hour, Jesus does not want to be alone:  he wants his friends at his side.  But these friends, who will scatter when Jesus is arrested, have already begun to abandon him:  they cannot even stay awake to keep him company.
     Peter, James, and John will become pillars of the Church, preaching the Good News far and wide.  Jesus wants these Apostles to be witnesses, not just of the divine signs and wonders he performs, but of his humanity and his suffering.  He wants them to be aware of his weakness—and their own.  Perhaps that is why the sacrament of penance is such an important part of our faith.  In becoming more aware of our own weakness, we become more compassionate and understanding towards others.
Sixth Day
James, one of the Twelve (Matthew 10:1-10)

            Jesus summoned his twelve disciples and gave them authority over unclean spirits to drive them out and to cure every disease and every illness. The names of the twelve apostles are these: first, Simon called Peter, and his brother Andrew; James, the son of Zebedee, and his brother John; Philip and Bartholomew, Thomas and Matthew the tax collector; James, the son of Alphaeus, and Thaddeus; Simon the Cananean, and Judas Iscariot who betrayed him.
            Jesus sent out these twelve after instructing them thus, "Do not go into pagan territory or enter a Samaritan town. Go rather to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. As you go, make this proclamation: 'The kingdom of heaven is at hand.'  Cure the sick, raise the dead, cleanse lepers, drive out demons. Without cost you have received; without cost you are to give. Do not take gold or silver or copper for your belts; no sack for the journey, or a second tunic, or sandals, or walking stick. The laborer deserves his keep.”

Reflection
Jesus gives the Apostles a mission.  They are to drive out demons, cure the sick, and proclaim the Kingdom of God:  in other words, their mission is Christ’s mission.
     The Apostles have an incredible gift to give:  freedom, healing, life.  But they are to give this gift as freely as they have received it.  They are to travel not like rich people, with horses, chariots, and retinues, but like homeless wanderers:  alone, unarmed, without so much as a change of clothes.  They are given great “authority,” but they must also become totally vulnerable, accepting the hospitality and generosity of others.  They are to be, in short, like Jesus, who “emptied himself, taking the form of a slave, and coming in human likeness.” (Philippians 2)  The Church is called to do the same.
Seventh Day
Their Mothers’ Request (Matthew 20: 20-23)

            The mother of the sons of Zebedee approached Jesus with her sons and did him homage, wishing to ask him for something. He said to her, "What do you wish?"
            She answered him, "Command that these two sons of mine sit, one at your right and the other at your left, in your kingdom."
            Jesus said in reply, "You do not know what you are asking. Can you drink the cup that I am going to drink?"
            They said to him, "We can."
            He replied, "My cup you will indeed drink, but to sit at my right and at my left, this is not mine to give but is for those for whom it has been prepared by my Father."

Reflection
In the Gospel according to Mark, James and John come to Jesus and ask for seats at his right and left—seats of honor and power—in the Kingdom.  In Matthew’s Gospel, it is their mother who makes the request.  It is ironic, to say the least, that this request comes immediately after Jesus tells his disciples, for the third time, what awaits him:  crucifixion and death; and after a whole series of parables with the theme “the last will be first, and the first will be last” (Matthew 20:16)!  Jesus responds honestly but gently to the ambition of the two brothers.  They will indeed drink his cup – James was the first of the Apostles to suffer martyrdom – but only the Father knows who will sit at his right and left in the Kingdom of heaven.  The only thing Jesus promises the brothers is suffering.

Eighth Day
Response of the Other Apostles (Matthew 20: 24-28)

When the ten heard this, they became indignant at the two brothers. But Jesus summoned them and said, "You know that the rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and the great ones make their authority over them felt. But it shall not be so among you. Rather, whoever wishes to be great among you shall be your servant; whoever wishes to be first among you shall be your slave. Just so, the Son of Man did not come to be served but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many."

Reflection
The disciples have listened as Jesus teaches them in parables – parables that speak of the topsy-turvy logic of God – the first last, and the last first.  In asking to sit at the right and left of Jesus in the Kingdom, James and John become a parable.  Do not jockey for position, Jesus warns his followers.  Do not be ambitious.  Instead, if you want to be great, become a servant; if you want to be first, take the last place.  Why?  Because that is what Jesus did.

Ninth Day
James, Witness to the Resurrection (Matthew 20: 16-20)
The eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain to which Jesus had ordered them.  When they saw him, they worshiped, but they doubted. Then Jesus approached and said to them, "All power in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, until the end of the age."
Reflection
“Apostle” means “one who is sent.”  In calling James and the others to be his Apostles, Jesus is sending them forth to continue the work he himself has begun, baptizing the nations, teaching, and proclaiming the Kingdom.  How did James live this call?  We know that he became a leader of the Church in Jerusalem (Paul referred to him as one of the “pillars” [Galatians 2:9]).  We know that he preached the Gospel – tradition tells us that he journeyed as far as Spain, the “ends of the earth.”  And we know that he was the first of the Apostles to suffer death for Christ (Acts 12:2).  We are not all called to be Apostles, but we can all make the pattern of James’ life our own:  listening to Christ, living for Christ, and dying for Christ.

Feast of St. James
Let Catholics rejoice!
Let the citizens of Heaven be glad
This day.
Let the priest with beautiful songs
And with chants busy himself
This day.
This is the praiseworthy day,
Noble with divine light,
This day.
When James to the palace
Of the Heavens ascended
This day.
Conquering Herod's sword,
He received the reward of life
This day.
Therefore without end
Let us bless the Lord
This day.
To the great Father in Heaven
Let us offer thankful praises
This day.
Pilgrims Prayer 
St. James!
We come to you in eager pilgrimage.
We come as part of a great throng of pilgrims
who through the centuries have come to this place,
where you are pilgrim and host, apostle and patron.
We come to you today
because we are on a common journey.
Place yourself, patron of pilgrims,
at the head of our pilgrimage.
Teach us, apostle and friend of the Lord,
the WAY which leads to him.
Open us, preacher of the Gospel,
to the TRUTH you learned from your Master’s lips.
Give us, witness of the faith,
the strength always to love the LIFE Christ gives.
We pray in Jesus’ name. Amen.

Today's Mass and Readings : Fri. July 25, 2014

Feast of Saint James, Apostle
Lectionary: 605


Reading 12 COR 4:7-15

Brothers and sisters:
We hold this treasure in earthen vessels,
that the surpassing power may be of God and not from us.
We are afflicted in every way, but not constrained;
perplexed, but not driven to despair;
persecuted, but not abandoned;
struck down, but not destroyed;
always carrying about in the body the dying of Jesus,
so that the life of Jesus may also be manifested in our body.
For we who live are constantly being given up to death
for the sake of Jesus,
so that the life of Jesus may be manifested in our mortal flesh.

So death is at work in us, but life in you.
Since, then, we have the same spirit of faith,
according to what is written, I believed, therefore I spoke,
we too believe and therefore speak,
knowing that the one who raised the Lord Jesus
will raise us also with Jesus
and place us with you in his presence.
Everything indeed is for you,
so that the grace bestowed in abundance on more and more people
may cause the thanksgiving to overflow for the glory of God.

Responsorial Psalm PS 126:1BC-2AB, 2CD-3, 4-5, 6

R. (5) Those who sow in tears shall reap rejoicing.
When the LORD brought back the captives of Zion,
we were like men dreaming.
Then our mouth was filled with laughter,
and our tongue with rejoicing.
R. Those who sow in tears shall reap rejoicing.
Then they said among the nations,
“The LORD has done great things for them.”
The LORD has done great things for us;
we are glad indeed.
R. Those who sow in tears shall reap rejoicing.
Restore our fortunes, O LORD,
like the torrents in the southern desert.
Those that sow in tears
shall reap rejoicing.
R. Those who sow in tears shall reap rejoicing.
Although they go forth weeping,
carrying the seed to be sown,
They shall come back rejoicing,
carrying their sheaves.
R. Those who sow in tears shall reap rejoicing.

Gospel MT 20:20-28

The mother of the sons of Zebedee approached Jesus with her sons
and did him homage, wishing to ask him for something.
He said to her,
“What do you wish?”
She answered him,
“Command that these two sons of mine sit,
one at your right and the other at your left, in your Kingdom.”
Jesus said in reply,
“You do not know what you are asking.
Can you drink the chalice that I am going to drink?”
They said to him, “We can.”
He replied,
“My chalice you will indeed drink,
but to sit at my right and at my left, this is not mine to give
but is for those for whom it has been prepared by my Father.”
When the ten heard this,
they became indignant at the two brothers.
But Jesus summoned them and said,
“You know that the rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them,
and the great ones make their authority over them felt.
But it shall not be so among you.
Rather, whoever wishes to be great among you shall be your servant;
whoever wishes to be first among you shall be your slave.
Just so, the Son of Man did not come to be served
but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many.”

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Saint July 25 : St. James the Greater : Apostle - Compostela Spain - Patron of Veterinarians and Pharmacists

St. James the Greater
APOSTLE AND PATRON SAINT OF SPAIN
Feast: July 25


Information:
Feast Day:July 25
Born:
1st century
Died:44, Judea
Major Shrine:Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain)
Patron of:Veterinarians, equestrians, furriers, tanners, pharmacists
The son of Zebedee (q.v.) and Salome (q.v. Cf. Matt., xvii, 56; Mark, xv, 40; xvi, 1). Zahn asserts that Salome was the daughter of a priest. James is styled "the Greater" to distinguish him from the Apostle James "the Less," who was probably shorter of stature. We know nothing of St. James's early life. He was the brother of John, the beloved disciple, and probably the elder of the two. His parents seem to have been people of means as appears from the following facts. Zebedee was a fisherman of the Lake of Galilee, who probably lived in or near Bethsaida (John, 1, 44), perhaps in Capharnaum; and had some boatmen or hired men as his usual attendants (Mark, 1, 20). Salome was one of the pious women who afterwards followed Christ and "ministered unto him of their substance" (cf. Matt., xxvii, 55, sq.; Mark, xv, 40; xvi, 1; Luke, viii, 2 sq.; xxiii, 55-xxiv, 1). St. John was personally known to the high-priest (John, xviii, 16); and must have had wherewithal to provide for the Mother of Jesus (John, xix, 27). It is probable, according to Acts, iv, 13, that John (and consequently his brother James) had not received the technical training of the rabbinical schools; in this sense they were unlearned and without any official position among the Jews. But, according to the social rank of their parents, they must have been men of ordinary education, in the common walks of Jewish life. They had frequent opportunity of coming in contact with Greek life and language, which were already widely spread along the shores of the Galilean Sea. Some authors, comparing John, xix, 25, with Matt., xxviii, 56, and Mark, xv, 40, identify, and probably rightly so, Mary the Mother of James the Less and of Joseph in Mark and Matthew with "Mary of Cleophas" in John. As the name of Mary Magdalen occurs in the three lists, they identify further Salome in Mark with "the mother of the sons of Zebedee" in Matthew; finally they identify Salome with "his mother's sister" in John. They suppose, for this last identification, that four women are designated by John, xix, 25; the Syriac "Peshito" gives the reading: "His mother and his mother's sister, and Mary of Cleophas and Mary Magdalen." If this last supposition is right, Salome was a sister of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and James the Greater and John were first cousins of the Lord; this may explain the discipleship of the two brothers, Salome's request and their own claim to the first position in His kingdom, and His commendation of the Blessed Virgin to her own nephew. But it is doubtful whether the Greek admits of this construction without the addition or the omission of kai (and). Thus the relationship of St. James to Jesus remains doubtful.
The Galilean origin of St. James in some degree explains the energy of temper and the vehemence of character which earned for him and St. John the name of Boanerges, "sons of thunder" (Mark. iii, 17); the Galilean race was religious, hardy, industrious, brave, and the strongest defender of the Jewish nation. When John the Baptist proclaimed the kingdom of the Messias, St. John became a disciple (John, i, 35); he was directed to "the Lamb of God" and afterwards brought his brother James to the Messias; the obvious meaning of John, i, 41, is that St. Andrew finds his brother (St. Peter) first and that afterwards St. John (who does not name himself, according to his habitual and characteristic reserve and silence about himself) finds his brother (St. James). The call of St. James to the discipleship of the Messias is reported in a parallel or identical narration by Matt., iv, 18-22; Mark, i, 19 sq.; and Luke, v, 1-11. The two sons of Zebedee, as well as Simon (Peter) and his brother Andrew with whom they were in partnership (Luke, v, 10), were called by the Lord upon the Sea of Galilee, where all four with Zebedee and his hired servants were engaged in their ordinary occupation of fishing. The sons of Zebedee "forthwith left their nets and father, and followed him" (Matt., iv, 22), and became "fishers of men". St. James was afterwards with the other eleven called to the Apostleship (Matt., x, 1-4; Mark, iii, 13-19; Luke, vi, 12-16; Acts, i, 13). In all four lists the names of Peter and Andrew, James and John form the first group, a prominent and chosen group (cf. Mark, xiii, 3); especially Peter, James, and John. These three Apostles alone were admitted to be present at the miracle of the raising of Jairus's daughter (Mark, v, 37; Luke, viii, 51), at the Transfiguration (Mark, ix, 1; Matt., xvii, 1; Luke, ix, 28), and the Agony in Gethsemani (Matt., xxvi, 37; Mark, xiv, 33). The fact that the name of James occurs always (except in Luke, viii, 51; ix, 28; Acts, i, 13—Gr. Text) before that of his brother seems to imply that James was the elder of the two. It is worthy of notice that James is never mentioned in the Gospel of St. John; this author observes a humble reserve not only with regard to himself, but also about the members of his family.
Several incidents scattered through the Synoptics suggest that James and John had that particular character indicated by the name "Boanerges," sons of thunder, given to them by the Lord (Mark, iii, 17); they were burning and impetuous in their evangelical zeal and severe in temper. The two brothers showed their fiery temperament against "a certain man casting out devils" in the name of the Christ; John, answering, said: "We [James is probably meant] forbade him, because he followeth not with us" (Luke, ix, 49). When the Samaritans refused to receive Christ, James and John said: "Lord, wilt thou that we command fire to come down from heaven, and consume them?" (Luke, ix, 54; cf. v. 49). On the last journey to Jerusalem, their mother Salome came to the Lord and said to Him: "Say that these my two sons may sit, the one on thy right hand, and the other on thy left, in thy kingdom" (Matt., xx, 21). And the two brothers, still ignorant of the spiritual nature of the Messianic Kingdom, joined with their mother in this eager ambition (Mark, x, 37). And on their assertion that they are willing to drink the chalice that He drinks of, and to be baptized with the baptism of His sufferings, Jesus assured them that they will share His sufferings (ibid., v. 38-39). James won the crown of martyrdom fourteen years after this prophecy, A.D. 44. Herod Agrippa I, son of Aristobulus and grandson of Herod the Great, reigned at that time as "king" over a wider dominion than that of his grandfather. His great object was to please the Jews in every way, and he showed great regard for the Mosaic Law and Jewish customs. In pursuance of this policy, on the occasion of the Passover of A.D. 44, he perpetrated cruelties upon the Church, whose rapid growth incensed the Jews. The zealous temper of James and his leading part in the Jewish Christian communities probably led Agrippa to choose him as the first victim. "He killed James, the brother of John, with the sword." (Acts, xii, 1-2). According to a tradition, which, as we learn from Eusebius (Hist. Eccl., II, ix, 2, 3), was received from Clement of Alexandria (in the seventh book of his lost "Hypotyposes"), the accuser who led the Apostle to judgment, moved by his confession, became himself a Christian, and they were beheaded together. As Clement testifies expressly that the account was given him "by those who were before him," this tradition has a better foundation than many other traditions and legends respecting the Apostolic labours and death of St. James, which are related in the Latin "Passio Jacobi Majoris", the Ethiopic "Acts of James", and so on. The tradition asserting that James the Greater preached the Gospel in Spain, and that his body was translated to Compostela, claims more serious consideration.
According to this tradition St. James the Greater, having preached Christianity in Spain, returned to Judea and was put to death by order of Herod; his body was miraculously translated to Iria Flavia in the northwest of Spain, and later to Compostela, which town, especially during the Middle Ages, became one of the most famous places of pilgrimage in the world. The vow of making a pilgrimage to Compostela to honour the sepulchre of St. James is still reserved to the pope, who alone of his own or ordinary right can dispense from it (see VOW). In the twelfth century was founded the Order of Knights of St. James of Compostela.
With regard to the preaching of the Gospel in Spain by St. James the greater, several difficulties have been raised:
• St. James suffered martyrdom A.D. 44 (Acts, xii, 2), and, according to the tradition of the early Church, he had not yet left Jerusalem at this time (cf. Clement of Alexandria, "Strom.", VI, Apollonius, quoted by Euseb., "Hist. Eccl." VI, xviii).
• St. Paul in his Epistle to the Romans (A.D. 58) expressed the intention to visit Spain (Rom., xv, 24) just after he had mentioned (xv, 20) that he did not "build upon another man's foundation."
• The argument ex silentio: although the tradition that James founded an Apostolic see in Spain was current in the year 700, no certain mention of such tradition is to be found in the genuine writings of early writers nor in the early councils; the first certain mention we find in the ninth century, in Notker, a monk of St. Gall (Martyrol., 25 July), Walafried Strabo (Poema de XII Apost.), and others.
• The tradition was not unanimously admitted afterwards, while numerous scholars reject it. The Bollandists however defended it (see Acta Sanctorum, July, VI and VII, where other sources are given).
The authenticity of the sacred relic of Compostela has been questioned and is still doubted. Even if St. James the Greater did not preach the Christian religion in Spain, his body may have been brought to Compostela, and this was already the opinion of Notker. According to another tradition, the relics of the Apostle are kept in the church of St-Saturnin at Toulouse (France), but it is not improbable that such sacred relics should have been divided between two churches. A strong argument in favour of the authenticity of the sacred relics of Compostela is the Bull of Leo XIII, "Omnipotens Deus," of 1 November, 1884.


SOURCE: http://www.ewtn.com/saintsHoly/saints/J/stjamesthegreater.asp#ixzz1T7TOR2WE