Tuesday, June 27, 2017

#Novena to Our Lady of Perpetual Help - SHARE #Miracle Prayer!

NOVENA PRAYERS 1.COME HOLY GHOST
(Kneel)
Come, Holy Ghost, Creator blest, And in our Souls take up Thy rest, Come with Thy grace and heavenly aid To fill the hearts which Thou hast made.
V. Send forth Thy Spirit and they shall be created;
R. And Thou shalt renew the face of the earth. LET US PRAY
O God , who didst teach the hearts of Thy faithful people by sending them the light of the Holy Spirit, grant us by the same Spirit, to have a right judgement in all things, and evermore to rejoice in his holy comfort, through Christ Our Lord, Amen 2. AN ACT OF CONTRITION
(Here, O God is my sacrifice, a broken spirit; a heart that is humbled and contrite, thou O God, will never disdain; ps 50:19)
My God, I believe in Thee.* I hope in thee .* I love Thee above all things.* With all my Soul,* With all my heart ,* and with all my strength ; * I love Thee because thou are infinitely good * And worthy of being loved * and because I love Thee,* I repent with all my heart * Of having offended Thee; * have mercy on me a sinner. Amen
3. FOR THE INTENTIONS OF THE HOLY FATHER
THE OUR FATHER
Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy Name, Thy Kingdom come, Thy will be done on earth, as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our trespasses , as we forgive those who trespass against us, and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen THE HAIL MARY
Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee Blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, JESUS , Holy Mary Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen THE GLORY BE TO THE FATHER
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son and to the Holy spirit.
As it was in the beginning , is now and ever shall be world without end . Amen
 4. INVOCATIONS TO OUR LADY
We fly to thy patronage, O Holy Mother of God. Despise not our petitions in our necessities. But ever deliver us from all dangers O glorious and blessed Virgin. Priest : O Mother of Perpetual Succour, thou whose very name inspires confidence.
People : Help me, O loving Mother.
Pr. : That I may love and serve God with all my heart.
Pe. : Help me, O loving mother
Pr. : That I may never neglect prayer
Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother.
Pr. : In temptations against the holy vitue of purity
Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother.
Pr. : That I may quickly rise again should I have the misfortune to fall into sin.
Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother
Pr. : That I may courageously resist the seductions of the world, evil companions, bad books and films Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother.
Pr. : That I may often and devoutly receive the Sacraments and fulfil my Christian duties and the duties of my state.
Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother.
Pr. : That I may be patient and resigned in all trials and troubles of life
Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother.
Pr. : In sickness and pain, in poverty and distress
Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother.
Pr. : That I may not delay my conversion from day to day
Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother.
Pr. : That I may ever love and serve thee and invoke thy assistance Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother.
Pr. : That I may be able to lead others to love serve and pray to thee
Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother.
Pr. : When death is near and I am about to pass into eternity.
Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother.
Pr. : To my last hour, to my last breath do thou watch over me.

Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother. Pr. : Pray for us O Mother of Perpetual Succour
Pe. : Help me, O loving Mother.
LET US PRAY O Almighty and merciful God * Who in order to assist the human race * Has willed the blessed virgin Mary * To become the Mother of Thy only-begotten Son * Grant we beseech Thee * That by her intercession * We may avoid the contagion of sin * And serve Thee with a pure heart * Through the same Christ Our Lord * Amen 5. SUMMARY OF PETITIONS & THANKSGIVINGS 6. NOVENA PRAYERS O Mother of Perpetual Succour * Behold me a miserable sinner at thy feet * I have recourse to thee and put my trust in thee * O Mother of Mercy, have pity upon me * I hear thee called by all * The refuge and the hope of sinners; * be then my refuge and my hope * Succour me for the love of Jesus Christ *; Stretch forth thy hand to me, * a poor sinner, * who recommend and dedicate myself to thee * As thy perpetual servant * I bless and thank God for having in His Mercy given me this confidence in Thee * the pledge , as I believe of my eternal salvation*
Alas, too often in past times have I miserably fallen * Because I had not recourse to thee * I know that with thy help I shall conquer * I know that thou will help me * If I recommend myself to thee * But I fear lest in the occasion of failing * I should cease to call upon thee * And so should lose my soul * This then is the grace I seek from thee, * and I beg of thee, as far as I know how and can, * to obtain it for me * namely, in the assaults of hell,* always to have recourse to thee and to say to thee; * O mary help me * Mother of Perpetual Succour, * Suffer me not to lose my God * Amen.
Priest : Mother of Perpetual Succour
People : Pray for thy Children.
Hail Mary.......... (Repeat three times)
Holy Mary, * Succour the miserable, help the faint hearted * Cheer those that weep, *Pray for the people ,* be the advocate of the clergy, * Intercede for all devout women, * Let all feel thine aid,* Who implore thy perpetual succour.
Priest : Thou has been made for us O Lady, a Refuge.
People : A helper in need and tribulation.
LET US PRAY
O Lord Jesus Christ,* Who hast given us Thy Mother Mary, * Whose wondrous image we venerate, * To our Mother ,* Ever ready to succour us,* grant , we beseech Thee,* That we, who earnestly implore her maternal aid, * May deserve to enjoy perpetually the fruit of thy redemption * Who lives and reigns world without end. Amen.

#PopeFrancis celebrates 25 Anniversary Mass as Bishop - ‘Arise! Look outward! Hope!” FULL Video - Text


Pope Francis celebrated Mass on Tuesday June 27, 2017 in the Pauline Chapel of the Apostolic Palace, with the members of the College of Cardinals present to mark the 25th jubilee of his ordination to the episcopacy.
The Holy Father’s Homily
In the first Reading, we heard how the dialogue continues between God and Abraham, that dialogue that began with that “Go. Go from your country . . .” (Genesis 12:1). And in this continuation of the dialogue, we find three imperatives: “Rise!” “Look!” “Hope!” Three imperatives that mark the way that Abraham must undertake and also the way to do it, the interior attitude: rise, look, hope.
“Rise!” Rise, walk, do not be still. You have a task, you have a mission and you must carry it out on the way. Do not stay seated: rise; stand up. And Abraham began to walk, always on the way. And the symbol of this is the tent. The Book of Genesis says that Abraham went with the tent, and when he stopped, the tent was there. Abraham never made a house for himself while there was this imperative: “Rise!” He only built an altar, the only thing, to adore Him who ordered him to rise, to be on the way, with the tent. “Rise!”
“Look!” Second imperative. “Lift up your eyes, and look from the place where you are, northward and southward, eastward and westward” (Genesis 13:14). Look. Look at the horizon; do not build walls. Look always and go on. And the mysticism [the spirituality] of the horizon is that the more one goes on the horizon is always farther. Push the look, push it forward, walking, but towards the horizon.
Third imperative: “Hope!” There is that beautiful dialogue: “[Lord], you have given me so much, but the heir will be this slave” – “The heir will issue from you, will be born of you. Hope!” (Cf. Genesis 15:3-4). And this, said to a man who could not have heredity, be it because of his age, be it because of his wife’s sterility. But he will be “of you.” And your heredity – of you – will be “as the dust of the earth: if one can count the dust of the earth, you will also be able to count your descendants” (Genesis 13:16). And a bit further one: “Lift up your eyes, look at the sky: count the stars, if you can. So shall be your descendants.” And Abraham believed, and the Lord credited it to him as righteousness (Cf. Genesis 15:5-6). With Abraham’s faith begins that righteousness that [the Apostle] Paul would carry forward with the explanation of justification.
“Rise! Look! – the horizon, no walls, the horizon – Hope!” And hope is without walls, it is pure horizon.
However, when Abraham was called he was more or less our age: he was about to retire, to retire to rest . . . He started out at that age. An elderly man, with the weight of old age, that old age that brings pains, sicknesses . . . But you, as if he were a youth, rise, go, go! As if he wee a scout: go! Look and hope. And this Word of God is also for us, who are of Abraham’s age . . . more or less – there are some young men here, but the majority of us are of this age; and today the Lord says the same to us: “Rise! Look! Hope!” He tells us that it is not the hour to close our life, not to close our history, not to abridge our history. The Lord tells us that our history is still open: it is open to the end; it is open with a mission. And with these three imperatives He indicates to us the mission: “Rise! Look! Hope!”
Someone who does not love us says of us that we are the gerontocracy of the Church. It is a mockery. He doesn’t understand what he says. We are not the aged, we are grandfathers, we are grandfathers. And if we do not feel this, we should ask for the grace to feel it — grandfathers whose grandchildren look at them, Grandfathers who must give them a sense of life with our experience. Grandfathers not closed in the melancholy of our history, but open to give this. And for us, this “rise, look, hope,” is called “to dream.” We are grandfathers called to dream and to give our dream to today’s youth: they need it, because they will draw from our dreams the strength to prophesy and to carry their task forward.
There comes to mind that passage of Luke’s Gospel (2:21-38), Simeon and Anna: two grandparents, but what capacity to dream these two had! And they told this whole dream to Saint Joseph, to Our Lady, to the people . . . And Anna went gossiping here and there and said: “It is He! It is He!” and she told the dream of her life. And this is what the Lord asks of us today: to be grandparents. To have the vitality to give to young people, because young people expect it from us; not to close ourselves but to give our best: they expect from our experience, from our positive dreams to take forward the prophecy and the work.
I ask the Lord to give all of us this grace, also for those that have not yet become grandfathers: we see the President [of the Bishops] of Brazil, he is a youth, . . . but he’ll catch up! The grace to be grandparents, the grace to dream, to give this dream to our young people: they need it.
[At the end of the Mass, before the blessing]
I want to thank you all for the words addressed to me by Cardinal Sodano, Dean, with the new Vice-Dean who is beside him – all good wishes! – I want to thank you for this common prayer on this anniversary, asking forgiveness for my sins and perseverance in faith, in hope, in charity. I thank you so much for this fraternal company and I ask the Lord to bless you and accompany you on the path of service to the Church. Thank you so much.
[Original text: Italian] [ZENIT-Translation by Virginia M. Forrester]

Today's Mass Readings and Video : Tues. June 27, 2017 - #Eucharist


Tuesday of the Twelfth Week in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 372


Reading 1GN 13:2, 5-18
















Abram was very rich in livestock, silver, and gold.

Lot, who went with Abram, also had flocks and herds and tents,
so that the land could not support them if they stayed together;
their possessions were so great that they could not dwell together.
There were quarrels between the herdsmen of Abram's livestock
and those of Lot's.
(At this time the Canaanites and the Perizzites
were occupying the land.)

So Abram said to Lot:
"Let there be no strife between you and me,
or between your herdsmen and mine, for we are kinsmen.
Is not the whole land at your disposal?
Please separate from me.
If you prefer the left, I will go to the right;
if you prefer the right, I will go to the left."
Lot looked about and saw how well watered
the whole Jordan Plain was as far as Zoar,
like the LORD's own garden, or like Egypt.
(This was before the LORD had destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah.)
Lot, therefore, chose for himself the whole Jordan Plain
and set out eastward.
Thus they separated from each other;
Abram stayed in the land of Canaan,
while Lot settled among the cities of the Plain,
pitching his tents near Sodom.
Now the inhabitants of Sodom were very wicked
in the sins they committed against the LORD.

After Lot had left, the LORD said to Abram:
"Look about you, and from where you are,
gaze to the north and south, east and west;
all the land that you see I will give to you
and your descendants forever.
I will make your descendants like the dust of the earth;
if anyone could count the dust of the earth,
your descendants too might be counted.
Set forth and walk about in the land, through its length and breadth,
for to you I will give it."
Abram moved his tents and went on to settle
near the terebinth of Mamre, which is at Hebron.
There he built an altar to the LORD.

Responsorial PsalmPS 15:2-3A, 3BC-4AB, 5

R. (1b) He who does justice will live in the presence of the Lord.
He who walks blamelessly and does justice;
who thinks the truth in his heart
and slanders not with his tongue.
R. He who does justice will live in the presence of the Lord.
Who harms not his fellow man,
nor takes up a reproach against his neighbor;
By whom the reprobate is despised,
while he honors those who fear the LORD.
R. He who does justice will live in the presence of the Lord.
Who lends not his money at usury
and accepts no bribe against the innocent.
He who does these things
shall never be disturbed.
R. He who does justice will live in the presence of the Lord.

AlleluiaJN 8:12

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
I am the light of the world, says the Lord;
whoever follows me will have the light of life.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelMT 7:6, 12-14

Jesus said to his disciples:
"Do not give what is holy to dogs, or throw your pearls before swine,
lest they trample them underfoot, and turn and tear you to pieces.

"Do to others whatever you would have them do to you.
This is the Law and the Prophets.

"Enter through the narrow gate;
for the gate is wide and the road broad that leads to destruction,
and those who enter through it are many.
How narrow the gate and constricted the road that leads to life.
And those who find it are few."

Saint June 27: Our Lady of Perpetual Help - #OurLady #PerpetualHelp


June 27, is the feast day of Our Lady of Perpetual Help, also known as Our Lady of Perpetual Succor, and the Madonna di San Matteo. We are reminded that Our Blessed Mother constantly intercedes for us with Jesus, Our Lord—in our times of struggle, pain, and difficulty.
Mother of Perpetual Help, you have been blessed and favored by God. You became not only the Mother of the Redeemer but the Mother of the redeemed as well. We come to you today as your loving children. Watch over us and take care of us. As you held the child Jesus in your loving arms, so take us in your arms. Be a mother ready at every moment to help us. For God who is mighty has done great things for you, and His mercy is from age to age on those who love Him. Our greatest fear is that in time of temptation, we may fail to call out to you, and become lost children. Intercede for us, dear Mother, in obtaining pardon for our sins, love for Jesus, final perseverance, and the grace always to call upon you, Mother of Perpetual Help.
Our Lady of Perpetual Help is a title and devotion given to Our Blessed Mother, following an association with a Byzantine painting originating as early as the 13th century. Since that time, this golden image has inspired Catholics to pray to the Blessed Virgin Mary for intercession with her beloved Son, Jesus Christ. The painting, as interpreted by art historians and theologians, represents a message of salvation and reparation: “You can come to me.” The icon, possibly painted in Crete by an unknown artist, depicts Our Blessed Mother, holding the infant Christ. To her right is the Archangel Michael, carrying the lance and sponge of the crucifixion. On her left is the Archangel Gabriel carrying the cross and nails used in the crucifixion. Also known as the Theotokos of the Passion, the icon suggests that Christ, even as an infant, knew of His passion and death, and is seeking the comfort of his mother.
The origins and early history of the painting are lost to record, but in the fifteenth century, the icon was first venerated at the Church of San Matteo. Prior to that, history suggests that the painting was stolen in Crete, and brought to Italy by a pious merchant, who eventually (possibly following an apparition of the Blessed Mother to his daughter) bequeathed the painting to the church, which was served for a time by the Hermits of Saint Augustine. The picture remained in the church for nearly three hundred years.
In 1812 the French invaded Rome and destroyed the church. The picture disappeared. Between 1863 and 1865 it was discovered in an oratory of the Augustinian Fathers at Santa Maria in Posterula. Under the direction of Pope Pius XI, the original icon was displayed for public veneration under the care of the Redemptorist Fathers at the Church of Saint Alphonsus (built on the original site of the destroyed Church of San Matteo), where it remains today.
Text shared from 365 Rosaries Blog
Powerful Prayer to Our Lady of Perpetual Help
O MOTHER of Perpetual Help, Grant that I may ever invoke Your most powerful name, Which is the safeguard of the living And the salvation of the dying.
O purest Mary! O sweetest Mary! Let your name henceforth Be ever on my lips.
Delay not, O Blessed Lady, To succor me Whenever I call on you.
In all my temptations, In all my needs, I will never cease To call on you Ever repeating Your sacred name, Mary, Mary!
Oh, what consolations, What sweetness, What confidence, What emotion fills my soul When I utter your sacred name, Or even only think of you!
I thank the Lord For having given you, For my good, So sweet, so powerful, So lovely a name.
But I will not be content With merely uttering your name. Let my love for you prompt me Ever to hail you, Mother of Perpetual Help.
Mother of Perpetual Help, Pray for me And grant me the favor I confidently ask of you.

Saint June 27 : St. Cyril of Alexandria : #Doctor of the #Church

St. Cyril of Alexandria
DOCTOR OF THE CHURCH
Feast: June 27


Information:
Feast Day:June 27
Born:376 at Alexandria, Egypt 
Died:444 at Alexandria, Egypt
Patron of:Alexandria, Egypt
Doctor of the Church. St. Cyril has his feast in the Western Church on the 28th of January; in the Greek Menaea it is found on the 9th of June, and (together with St. Athanasius) on the 18th of January.
He seems to have been of an Alexandrian family and was the son of the brother of Theophilus, Patriarch of Alexandria; if he is the Cyril addressed by Isidore of Pelusium in Ep. xxv of Bk. I, he was for a time a monk. He accompanied Theophilus to Constantinople when that bishop held the "Synod of the Oak" in 402 and deposed St. John Chrysostom. Theophilus died 15 Oct., 412, and on the 18th Cyril was consecrated his uncle's successor, but only after a riot between his supporters and those of his rival Timotheus. Socrates complains bitterly that one of his first acts was to plunder and shut the churches of the Novatians. He also drove out of Alexandria the Jews, who had formed a flourishing community there since Alexander the Great. But they had caused tumults and had massacred the Christians, to defend whom Cyril himself assembled a mob. This may have been the only possible defence, since the Prefect of Egypt, Orestes, who was very angry at the expulsion of the Jews was also jealous of the power of Cyril, which certainly rivaled his own. Five hundred monks came down from Nitria to defend the patriarch. In a disturbance which arose, Orestes was wounded in the head by a stone thrown by a monk named Ammonius. The prefect had Ammonius tortured to death, and the young and fiery patriarch honoured his remains for a time as those of a martyr. The Alexandians were always riotous as we learn from Socrates  (VII, vii) and from St. Cyril himself (Hom. for Easter, 419). In one of these riots, in 422, the prefect Callistus was killed, and in another was committed the murder of a female philosopher Hypatia, a highly-respected teacher of neo-Platoism, of advanced age and (it is said) many virtues. She was a friend of Orestes, and many believed that she prevented a reconciliation between the prefect and patriarch. A mob led by a lector, named Peter, dragged her to a church and tore her flesh with potsherds till she died. This brought great disgrace, says Socrates, on the Church of Alexandria and on its bishop; but a lector at Alexandria was not a cleric (Scr., V, xxii), and Socrates does not suggest that Cyril himself was to blame. Damascius, indeed, accuses him, but he is a late authority and a hater of Christians.

Theophilus, the persecutor of Chrysostom, had not the privilege of communion with Rome from that saint's death, in 406, until his own. For some years Cyril also refused to insert the name of St. Chrysostom in the diptychs of his Church, in spite of the requests of Chrysostom's supplanter, Atticus. Later he seems to  have yielded to the representations of his spiritual father, Isisdore of Pelusium (Isid., Ep. I, 370). Yet even after the Council of Ephesus that saint still found something to rebuke in him on this matter (Ep. I, 310). But at last Cyril seems to have long since been trusted by Rome.

It was in the winter of 427-28 that the Antiochene Nestorius became Patriarch of Constantinople. His heretical teaching soon became known to Cyril. Against him Cyril taught the use of the term Theotokus in his Paschal letter for 429 and in a letter to the monks of Egypt. A correspondence with Nestorius followed, in a more moderate tone than might have been expected. Nestorius sent his sermons to Pope Celestine, but he received no reply, for the latter wrote to St. Cyril for further information. Rome had taken the side of St. John Chrysostom against Theophilus, but had neither censured the orthodoxy of the latter, nor consented to the patriarchal powers exercised by the bishops of Constantinople. To St. Celestine Cyril was not only the first prelate of the East, he was also the inheritor of the traditions of Athanasius and Peter. The pope's confidence was not misplaced. Cyril had learnt prudence. Peter had attempted unsuccessfully to appoint a Bishop of Constantinople; Theophilus had deposed another. Cyril, though in this case Alexandria was in the right, does not act in his own name, but denounces Nestorius to St. Celestine, since ancient custom, he says, persuaded him to bring the matter before the pope. He relates all that had occurred, and begs Celestine to decree what he sees fit (typosai to dokoun--a phrase which Dr. Bright chooses to weaken into "formulate his opinion"), and communicate it also to the Bishops of Macedonia and of the East (i.e. the Antiochene Patriarchate).

The pope's reply was of astonishing severity. He had already commissioned Cassian to write his well known treatise on the Incarnation. He now summoned a council (such Roman councils had somewhat the office of the modern Roman Congregations), and dispatched a letter to Alexandria with enclosures to Constantinople, Philippi, Jerusalem, and Antioch. Cyril is to take to himself the authority of the Roman See and to admonish Nestorius that unless he recants within ten days from the receipt of this ultimatum, he is separated from "our body" (the popes of the day had the habit of speaking of the other churches as the members, of which they are the head; the body is, of course the Catholic Church). If Nestorius does not submit, Cyril is to "provide for" the Church of Constantinople. Such a sentence of excommunication and deposition is not to be confounded with the mere withdrawal of actual communion by the popes from Cyril himself at an earlier date, from Theophilus, or, in Antioch, from Flavian or Meletius. It was the decree Cyril has asked for. As Cyril had twice written to Nestorius, his citation in the name of the pope is to be counted as a third warning, after which no grace is to be given.

St. Cyril summoned a council of his suffragans, and composed a letter which were appended twelve propositions for Nestorius to anathematize. The epistle was not conciliatory, and Nestorius may well have been taken aback. The twelve propositions did not emanate from Rome, and were not equally clear; one or two  of them were later among the authorities invoked by the Monophysite heretics in their own favour. Cyril was the head of the rival theological school to that of Antioch, where Nestorius had studied, and was the hereditary rival of the Constantinopolitan would-be patriarch. Cyril wrote also to John, Patriarch of Antioch, informing him of the facts, and insinuating that if John should support his old friend Nestorius, he would find himself isolated over against Rome, Macedonia, and Egypt. John took the hint and urged Nestorius to yield. Meanwhile, in Constantinople itself large numbers of the people held aloof from Nestorius, and the Emperor Theodosius II had been persuaded to summon a general council to meet at Ephesus. The imperial letters were dispatched 19 November, whereas the bishops sent by Cyril arrived at Constantinople only on 7 December. Nestorius, somewhat naturally, refused to accept the message sent by his rival, and on the 13th and 14th of December preached publicly against Cyril as a calumniator, and as having used bribes (which was probably as true as it was  usual); but he declared himself willing to use the word Theotokos. These sermons he sent to John of Antioch, who preferred them to the anathematizations of Cyril. Nestorius, however, issued twelve propositions with appended anathemas. If Cyril's propositions might be might be taken to deny the two natures in Christ, those of Nestorius hardly veiled his belief in two distinct persons. Theodoret urged John yet further, and wrote a treatise against Cyril, to which the latter replied with some warmth. He also wrote an "Answer" in five books to the sermons of Nestorius.
As the fifteenth-century idea of an oecumenical council superior to the pope had yet to be invented, and there was but one precedent for such an assembly, we need not be surprised that St. Celestine welcomed the initiative of the emperor, and hoped for peace through the assembly. (See EPHESUS, COUNCIL OF.) Nestorius found the churches of Ephesus closed to him, when he arrived with the imperial commissioner, Count Candidian, and his own friend, Count Irenaeus. Cyril came with fifty of his bishops. Palestine, Crete, Asia Minor, and Greece added their quotient. But John of Antioch and his suffragans were delayed. Cyril may have believed, rightly or wrongly, that John did not wish to be present at the trial of his friend Nestorius, or that he wished to gain time for him, and he opened  the council without John, on 22 June, in spite of the request of sixty-eight bishops for a delay. This was an initial error, which had disastrous results.
The legates from Rome had not arrived, so that Cyril had no answer to the letter he had written to Celestine asking "whether the holy synod should receive a man who condemned what it preached, or, because the time of delay had elapsed, whether the sentence was still in force". Cyril might have presumed that the pope, in agreeing to send legates to the council, intended Nestorius to have a complete trial, but it was more convenient to assume that the Roman ultimatum had not been suspended, and that the council was bound by it. He therefore took the place of president, not only as the highest of rank, but also as still holding the place of Celestine, though he cannot have received any fresh commission from the pope. Nestorius was summoned, in order that he might explain his neglect of Cyril's former monition in the name of the pope. He refused to receive the four bishops whom the council sent to him. Consequently nothing remained but formal procedure. For the council was bound by the canons to depose Nestorius for contumacy, as he would not appear, and by the letter of Celestine to condemn him for heresy, as he had not recanted. The correspondence between Rome, Alexandria, and Constantinople was read, some testimonies where read from earlier writers show the errors of Nestorius. The second letter of Cyril to Nestorius was approved by all the bishops. The reply of Nestorius was condemned. No discussion took place. The letter of Cyril and the ten anathemaizations raised no comment. All was concluded at one sitting. The council declared that it was "of necessity impelled" by the canons and by the letter of Celestine to declare Nestorius deposed and excommunicated. The papal legates, who had been detained by bad weather, arrived on the 10th of July, and they solemnly confirmed the sentence by the authority of St. Peter, for the refusal of Nestorius to appear had made useless the permission which they brought from the pope to grant him forgiveness if he should repent. But meanwhile John of Antioch and his party had arrived on the 26th and 27th of June. They formed themselves into a rival council of forty-three bishops, and deposed Memnon, Bishop of Ephesus, and St. Cyril, accusing the latter of Apollinarianism and even of Eunomianism. Both parties now appealed to the emperor, who took the amazing decision of sending a count to treat Nestorius, Cyril, and Memnon as being all three lawfully deposed. They were kept in close custody; but eventually the emperor took the orthodox view, though he dissolved the council; Cyril was allowed to return to his diocese, and Nestorius went into retirement at Antioch. Later he was banished to the Great Oasis of Egypt.

Meanwhile Pope Celestine was dead. His successor, St. Sixtus III, confirmed the council and attempted to get John of Antioch to anathematize Nestorius. For some time the strongest opponent of Cyril was Theodoret, but eventually he approved a letter of Cyril to Acacius of Berhoea. John sent Paul, Bishop of Emesa, as his plenipotentiary to Alexandria, and he patched up reconciliation with Cyril. Though Theodoret still refused to denounce the defence of Nestorius, John did so, and Cyril declared his joy in a letter to John. Isidore of Pelusium was now afraid that the impulsive Cyril might have yielded too much (Ep. i, 334). The great patriarch composed many further treatises, dogmatic letters, and sermons. He died on the 9th or the 27th of June, 444, after an episcopate of nearly thirty-two years.

(Taken from Catholic Encyclopedia)

Monday, June 26, 2017

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2011 Drama Arising out of the horror of the Spanish Civil War, a candidate for canonization is investigated by a journalist who discovers his own estranged father had a deep, dark and devastating connection to the saint's life. IN ENGLISH
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The film is "based on true events"; while the outlines of the portion of Josemaría Escrivá's life presented in the movie are broadly accurate, most of the scenes in which Escrivá appears are fictional.   Rated PG-13 for "violence and combat sequences, some language and thematic elements." Director/Writer:   Roland Joffé

Stars:

  Charlie Cox, Wes Bentley, Dougray Scott 

#PopeFrancis "A Christian does not read the horoscope to foresee the future; a Christian does not consult a fortune teller..." Homily

(Vatican Radio) Pope Francis on Monday told believers not to look to horoscopes or to consult fortune-tellers to foresee the future; but to allow God to guide them in a journey full of surprises.
The Pope was speaking during the last Santa Marta Mass of the season before the summer holidays and his return from an apostolic visit to Colombia in September.
Inviting Christians not to be “too settled, stationary, fixed,” Pope Francis reflected on the liturgical reading of the day in which God asks Abraham to leave his country, his homeland, his father’s house and go forth with his kinsfolk, and Abraham – who was seventy five years old – went, as the Lord directed him. 
“There is a Christian life-style” the Pope said, “a life-style based on three dimensions: “renunciation”, “promise” and “blessing”.
"To be a Christian always implies this dimension of stripping oneself” of something, it’s a dimension that reflects Jesus’s renunciation on the Cross, he said. 
There is always the need to “go forth”, to take a first step and “'leave your land, your family, your father's house.”
The Bible and the Gospels, the Pope said, are full of stories and episodes in which the prophets and the disciples are called to go forth.
Christians, he continued, must a have the “capacity” to be “stripped and to renounce” otherwise they are not “authentic Christians.”
Abraham, he said, obeyed the Lord in faith, and set out for an unknown land to “receive an inheritance.”
"A Christian does not read the horoscope to foresee the future; a Christian does not consult a fortune teller who looks into a crystal ball or reads your palm…” the Pope said.
A Christian, he said, allows himself to be guided by God who takes us on the path towards the fulfillment of his promise.
“We are men and women who walk towards a promise” he said – the way Abraham walked towards a new land”.
And yet, Francis continued, Abraham did not build a house, he pitched a tent, indicating  that “he was on a journey and trusted God”;  he built an altar “to worship Him” and then he kept on walking: he was always on the go.
The journey of a Christian, the Pope explained, starts anew every morning, trusting in the Lord and open to his many surprises.
He pointed out that at times these surprises are good, at others bad – “think of an illness or of a death” – he said – but we must always be open because we know that He will take us to a safe place, to a land that has been prepared especially for us.
Another trait of the Christian is that he or she always carries a blessing. Christians speak well of the Lord and of others, and ask for God’s blessing to go forward on their paths.
This, the Pope said, is the pattern of our Christian life because everyone, “even lay people, must bless others, speak well of God and of others.”
Too often, he added, we speak badly of our neighbor, “our tongues wag too much” instead of following the order that God gave to “our father” Abraham as a lesson for life:
“That of walking, of letting ourselves be stripped by the Lord, of trusting in his promises and of being irreprehensible” he said.
“Deep down, Francis concluded, Christian life is so simple!”

Today's Mass Readings and Video : Monday June 26, 2017 - #Eucharist

Monday of the Twelfth Week in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 371


Reading 1GN 12:1-9

The LORD said to Abram:
"Go forth from the land of your kinsfolk
and from your father's house to a land that I will show you.

"I will make of you a great nation,
and I will bless you;
I will make your name great,
so that you will be a blessing.
I will bless those who bless you
and curse those who curse you.
All the communities of the earth
shall find blessing in you."

Abram went as the LORD directed him, and Lot went with him.
Abram was seventy-five years old when he left Haran.
Abram took his wife, Sarai, his brother's son Lot,
all the possessions that they had accumulated,
and the persons they had acquired in Haran,
and they set out for the land of Canaan.
When they came to the land of Canaan, Abram passed through the land
as far as the sacred place at Shechem,
by the terebinth of Moreh.
(The Canaanites were then in the land.)

The LORD appeared to Abram and said,
"To your descendants I will give this land."
So Abram built an altar there to the LORD who had appeared to him.
From there he moved on to the hill country east of Bethel,
pitching his tent with Bethel to the west and Ai to the east.
He built an altar there to the LORD and invoked the LORD by name.
Then Abram journeyed on by stages to the Negeb.

Responsorial PsalmPS 33:12-13, 18-19, 20 AND 22

R. (12) Blessed the people the Lord has chosen to be his own.
Blessed the nation whose God is the LORD,
the people he has chosen for his own inheritance.
From heaven the LORD looks down;
he sees all mankind.
R. Blessed the people the Lord has chosen to be his own.
See, the eyes of the LORD are upon those who fear him,
upon those who hope for his kindness,
To deliver them from death
and preserve them in spite of famine.
R. Blessed the people the Lord has chosen to be his own.
Our soul waits for the LORD,
who is our help and our shield.
May your kindness, O LORD, be upon us
who have put our hope in you.
R. Blessed the people the Lord has chosen to be his own.

AlleluiaHEB 4:12

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
The word of God is living and effective,
able to discern reflections and thoughts of the heart.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

GospelMT 7:1-5

Jesus said to his disciples:
"Stop judging, that you may not be judged.
For as you judge, so will you be judged,
and the measure with which you measure will be measured out to you.
Why do you notice the splinter in your brother's eye,
but do not perceive the wooden beam in your own eye?
How can you say to your brother,
'Let me remove that splinter from your eye,'
while the wooden beam is in your eye?
You hypocrite, remove the wooden beam from your eye first;
then you will see clearly
to remove the splinter from your brother's eye."

Sunday, June 25, 2017

Saint June 26 : St. Josemaria Escriva : Founder #OpusDei : Patron of Diabetics and Ordinary Life

Josemaria Escriva was born in Spain on January 9, 1902 and died in Rome on June 26, 1975. On 2 October 1928, by divine inspiration, he founded Opus Dei.
1902 - 1975

A brief biography

Saint Josemaria Escriva was born in Barbastro, Spain, on 9 January 1902. He was ordained to the priesthood in Saragossa on 28 March 1925. On 2 October 1928, by divine inspiration, he founded Opus Dei.
Saint Josemaria Escriva was born in Barbastro, Spain, on 9 January 1902. He was ordained to the priesthood in Saragossa on 28 March 1925. On 2 October 1928, by divine inspiration, he founded Opus Dei. On 26 June 1975, he died unexpectedly in Rome in the room where he worked, after a last affectionate glance at a picture of Our Lady. Opus Dei had by then spread to five continents, with over 60.000 members of 80 nationalities, serving the Church with the same spirit of complete union with the Pope and the Bishops which characterised Saint Josemaría. His Holiness Pope John Paul II canonised the Founder of Opus Dei on 6 October 2002. His feast is celebrated on 26 June. The body of Saint Josemaría rests in the prelatic Church of Our Lady of Peace, Viale Bruno Buozzi 75, Rome.

More information
1902 - 0

A Christian Family

St Josemaria recalled gratefully how his parents introduced him step by step to the Christian way of life
1914 - 1918

Footprints in the Snow

It may seem surprising that a little thing like some footprints in the snow was enough to make a teenager take the great decision to give his life to God. But that is the language God often uses to call people, and that is how generous souls who seek God sincerely are capable of responding, with faith.
1918 - 1925

The Seminary Years

Why am I becoming a priest? Our Lord wants something: what is it? And in Latin — not very elegant Latin — … I kept repeating Domine, ut videam! Ut sit! Ut sit! The thing that you want, and that I don’t know — make it happen!”
1925 - 1928

Among the Poor and the Sick

Among the poor, the sick, and the children, he sought the strength needed to set in motion the immense project that God had placed on his shoulders that day. It was a school of suffering where his soul would be tempered to its mission.
1928

The Founding of Opus Dei

“I was 26, had God’s grace and good humor and nothing else. And I had to do Opus Dei”.
It was October 2, 1928, the feast of the Guardian Angels. Father Josemaría would never forget the sound of the church bells…
He was doing a retreat during these first few days of October.
1928 - 1936

The First Years of Opus Dei

1928, 1929, 1930… St Josemaria had to fulfil God’s will, but had no trained assistants, no money, and no patrons.
1936 - 1939

The Civil War

The Spanish Civil War has broken out, together with one of the most violent periods of religious persecution in the history of the Church
1938 - 1945

Beginning Again

After escaping to the other side of Spain and staying briefly in Pamplona, St Josemaria settled in Burgos. From there, in conditions of great deprivation, in a country devastated by war, he carried out an intense apostolate.
1939 - 1946

Helping Priests

“I began to give many, many retreats — they used to last seven days at that time — in a number of Spanish dioceses. I was very young and it embarrassed me."
1946

Traveling to Rome

Christ, Mary, and the Pope had always been the great loves of his life. And now at last he was there, very close to the Vicar of Christ, on the night of June 23-24, 1946.
1946 - 1951

Joy, Sorrow, Hope

“Do you know why the Work has developed so much? Because it’s been treated like a sack of wheat; it’s been beaten and battered about. But the seeds are so small that they haven’t broken. On the contrary, they’ve been scattered to the four winds...”
Hence the Father’s joy when he discovered the canonical way for married people to join Opus Dei.
1946 - 1951

Expansion

Between 1946 and 1960 Opus Dei began its apostolate in several new countries, including Portugal, Italy, Great Britain, France, Ireland, the US, Kenya, and Japan.
These were years of physical suffering. The Father’s diabetes was the cause of great discomfort: he lived with a constant headache, suffered chronic thirst, and gained too much weight, in addition to the other problems that can arise in connection with this illness.
1952 - 1970

Of a hundred souls, we are interested in a hundred

On October 2, 1928, St Josemaria had seen that Opus Dei was for all kinds of people.
1962 - 1965

Vatican II

On January 25, 1959, on hearing that an ecumenical council had been convened, the founder of Opus Dei welcomed the news with great hope and asked everyone to pray “for the happy outcome of this great initiative of an ecumenical council.”
1970 - 1971

Difficult Times

“If we all pray together, if we add just a bit of good will, our Lord will give us his grace and end this dark, terrible night. Then will come the dawn, the morning filled with sunlight.”
1970 - 1975

Catechetical Trips

St Josemaria decided to put his shoulder to the wheel in the task of strengthening people’s faith. Starting in 1970, he went on long catechetical trips to various countries around the world.
1975

I Seek Your Face

St Josemaria’s soul burned with the desire to see God’s face. “Lord, I long to see your face, to contemplate you in wonder!”
1975

I Will Help You More

On June 26, 1975, at 12 noon, St Josemaria died in his office. The news of his death traveled quickly round the world.
Shared from josemariaescriva.info