Monday, October 3, 2011

AFRICA: LIBYA: BISHOP CALLS SITUATION DESPERATE IN GADDAFI HOME TOWN

Agenzia Fides REPORT - "I thank the Italian government for having hospitalized the injured in Italian hospitals. Even other Countries should do such humanitarian gestures" said Archbishop Giovanni Innocenzo Martinelli, Apostolic Vicar of Tripoli to Fides. Last week, 25 people were injured, victims of the fighting which is still ongoing in Libya, and were transported by the Italian Air Force to be hospitalized in Rome.
The International Red Cross defines the situation in Sirte "desperate", Gaddafi's home town, were the fighting between the forces of the Transitional National Council and the faithful of the Libyan leader deposed are concentrated. According to the Red Cross, as well as water, electricity and food, medicine is beginning to lack in the city. Until now about 10 thousand people have left Sirte, which had 70 000 inhabitants. Of these 10 000, at least one third have decided to set up camps in desert areas a few kilometers from the city, so as not to stray too far from their homes. Meanwhile, the situation is getting worse in hospitals where patients continue to die due to lack of oxygen and fuel for generators.
"The fact that we continue to fight saddenes me very much", continues Mgr. Martinelli. "Here in Tripoli people are optimistic about the rapid conclusion of the siege in Sirte and Beni Walid, but in reality there is a resistance that does not sleep. We hope that a peaceful solution is found as soon as possible to avoid more victims".
As far as Tripoli is concerned, Mgr. Martinelli states that "essential services are pretty much guaranteed. We are also happy that by early November, the re-establishment of flights from Tripoli have been announced".
"The life of the Church continues, and we have the joy of having here with us Archbishop Tommaso Caputo, Apostolic Nuncio to Malta and Libya, on a visit to Tripoli for contacts with the new authorities", concludes Mgr. Martinelli. (L.M.) (Agenzia Fides 03/10/2011)

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